Recently Published Law Books

by Paul Schiff Berman
Ashgate Publishing
ISBN: 0754624129
Published: January, 2006

'International law' is no longer a sufficient rubric to describe the complexities of law in an era of globalization. Accordingly, this collection situates cross-border norm development at the intersection of interdisciplinary scholarship on comparative law, conflict of laws, civil procedure, cyberlaw, legal pluralism and the cultural analysis of law, as well as traditional international law.

by Paul Schiff Berman
Ashgate Publishing
ISBN: 0754624935
Published: September, 2007

During the past decade, the rise of online communication has proven to be particularly fertile ground for academic exploration at the intersection of law and society. Scholars have considered how best to apply existing law to new technological problems but they also have returned to first principles, considering fundamental questions about what law is, how it is formed and its relation to cultural and technological change.

by Christopher L. Eisgruber and Lawrence G. Sager
Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0-674-02305-6
Published: February, 2007

Religion has become a charged token in a politics of division. In disputes about faith-based social services, public money for religious schools, the Pledge of Allegiance, Ten Commandments monuments, the theory of evolution, and many other topics, angry contestation threatens to displace America's historic commitment to religious freedom. Part of the problem, the authors argue, is that constitutional analysis of religious freedom has been hobbled by the idea of "a wall of separation" between church and state.

by Harold James
Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691122210
Published: March, 2006

Modern America owes the Roman Empire for more than gladiator movies and the architecture of the nation's Capitol. It can also thank the ancient republic for some helpful lessons in globalization. So argues economic historian Harold James in this masterful work of intellectual history. The book addresses what James terms "the Roman dilemma"--the paradoxical notion that while global society depends on a system of rules for building peace and prosperity, this system inevitably leads to domestic clashes, international rivalry, and even wars.

by Lawrence Rosen
Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691125554
Published: July, 2006

Law is integral to culture, and culture to law. Often considered a distinctive domain with strange rules and stranger language, law is actually part of a culture's way of expressing its sense of the order of things.