Anthony Chen, Northwestern University

Beyond the Open Door: The Origins of Affirmative Action at Cornell and Michigan

Date: 
Mon, 11/11/2013
Location: 
4:30-6 PM, Kerstetter Room, Marx Hall

Please join us for a LAPA Seminar with Anthony Chen, Associate Professor of Sociology and Political Science at Northwestern University, who will present ""Beyond the Open Door: The Origins of Affirmative Action at Cornell and Michigan." His commentator is Cybelle Fox, assistant professor of sociology at UC Berkeley and a visiting fellow at the Russell Sage Foundation in New York City

As always, the LAPA format asks that seminar participants familiarize themselves with the paper in advance. The commentator will open the session by summarizing the main themes in the paper and presenting some topics for discussion. The author then has the right of first response before we open to the floor for questions. The seminar will end with a brief reception in the Kerstetter Room, giving everyone a chance to mingle and meet.

Professor Chen writes:  "The standard narrative about the rise of racially conscious affirmative action in undergraduate admissions suggests that it was a product of campus protests and urban riots that swept the country from the mid- to late-1960s. But such programs at the University of Michigan and Cornell began earlier. There, affirmative action was not hastily invented in 1965, 1967, or 1968 as a response to actual or threatened disorder. Instead, it emerged in 1963 and 1964 as a northern "ripple effect" of southern-based protest against Jim Crow segregation."

Anthony Chen is Associate Professor of Sociology and Political Science at Northwestern University and a Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Policy Research. Chen’s first book, The Fifth Freedom: Jobs, Politics, and Civil Rights in the United States, 1941-1972 (Princeton, 2009), was co-winner of the Gladys M. Kammerer Award (2010) from the American Political Science Association (APSA), co-winner of the J. David Greenstone Award (2010) from the APSA’s Politics and History Section, winner of the Best Book Award (2010) from the APSA’s Race, Ethnicity, and Politics Section, and winner of the President's Book Award (2008) from the Social Science History Association. His work has appeared in the American Journal of Sociology, the Journal of American History, the Journal of Health PoliticsPolicy and Law, and Studies in American Political Development. He is co-editor of Studies in American Political Development. He received a BA from Rice University and a PhD in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley, where he was a Soros Fellow. Chen has been a Visiting Scholar at the American Bar Foundation as well as a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at the Berkeley and San Francisco campuses of the University of California. Before joining Northwestern in 2010, Chen was on the faculty for eight years at the University of Michigan, where he held appointments in the Department of Sociology and the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. He currently lives in Chicago.

Cybelle Fox is assistant professor of sociology at UC Berkeley and a visiting fellow at the Russell Sage Foundation in New York City. Her main research interests are in race, immigration and the American welfare state. She received her B.A. in history and economics from UC San Diego and her PhD in sociology and social policy from Harvard University. Her most recent book, Three Worlds of Relief (Princeton University Press, 2012), compares the incorporation of blacks, Mexicans, and European immigrants in the American welfare system from the Progressive Era to the New Deal. Fox won five book awards for Three Worlds of Relief, including the 2012 C. Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems. Fox’s work has appeared in the American Journal of Sociology, American Behavioral Scientist, Sociology of Education, Political Science Quarterly, and Sociological Methods and Research. She is also co-author of Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings (Basic Books, 2004).

Funded by the Bouton Law Lecture Fund