Christopher Wildeman (Yale University) and Sarah Wakefield (Rutgers University)

Children of the Prison Boom: Mass Incarceration and the Future of Inequality

Date: 
Thu, 01/30/2014
Location: 
6:30 PM, 128 Davidson Hall, Rutgers-New Brunswick

Please join us for the first meeting of the Princeton/LAPA-Rutgers Criminal Justice Working Group, when Christopher Wildeman and Sarah Wakefield present, "Children of the Prison Boom: Mass Incarceration and the Future of Inequality."

The Criminal Justice Working Group is designed to bring together faculty and graduate students from both institutions to share work-in-progress, new ideas, and recent papers. Group participants may also invite scholars from other universities as presenters and commentators.

We invite all those interested in participating in the Criminal Justice Working Group to join the listserv that will keep you informed of the meetings.

Location:  Rutgers University
128 Davison Hall, Douglass Campus, New Brunswick
26 Nichol Avenue
Directions:  http://rumaps.rutgers.edu/location/davison-hall

Abstract: "An unrelenting prison boom, marked by stark racial disparities, pulled a disproportionate number of young black men into prison in the last forty years. In Children of the Prison Boom, Sara Wakefield and Christopher Wildeman draw upon broadly representative survey data and interviews to describe the devastating effects of America's experiment in mass incarceration on a generation of vulnerable children tied to these men. In so doing, they show that the effects of mass imprisonment may be even greater on the children left behind than on the men who were locked up."

Christopher Wildeman is an Associate Professor of Sociology, a faculty fellow at the Center for Research on Inequalities and the Life Course (CIQLE), and a faculty fellow at the Institution for Social and Policy Studies (ISPS) at Yale University. Since 2013, he has been a visiting fellow at the Bureau of Justice Statistics. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology and Demography from Princeton University in 2008. From 2008-2010, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar and postdoctoral affiliate in the Population Studies Center (PSC) at the University of Michigan. His research and teaching interests revolve around the consequences of mass imprisonment for inequality, with emphasis on families, health, and children. He is also interested in child welfare more broadly, especially as relates to child maltreatment and the foster care system. He is the 2013 recipient of the Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award from the American Society of Criminology. 

Sara Wakefield is an Assistant Professor at the Rutgers School of Criminal Justice.  She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Sociology at the University of Minnesota in 2007. Her research interests focus on the consequences of mass imprisonment for the family, with an emphasis on childhood wellbeing and racial inequality, culminating in a series of articles and book, Children of the Prison Boom: Mass Incarceration and the Future of American Inequality. In other work, Dr. Wakefield is an investigator on a multi-disciplinary, NICHD-funded (PO1) study of human capital interventions during childhood and adolescence. Her research is focused on the congruence (or “fit”) between substance use prevention policies and the developmental needs of children and youth.