The Honorable Stuart Rabner, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey

The New Jersey Supreme Court: A Perspective from the Bench

Date: 
Wed, 03/03/2010 - 4:30pm
Location: 
Dodds Auditorium, Robertson Hall
Audience: 
Public

Please join us on March 3 when The Honorable Stuart Rabner, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey and Princeton University's provost Christopher Eisgruber discuss "The New Jersey Supreme Court: A Perspective from the Bench."

The John Marshall Harlan '20 Lecture in Constitutional Adjudication honors the 1920 Princeton graduate who served on the U.S. Supreme Court from 1955 until 1971. Harlan was the eighth Princetonian to serve on the court.

This year's Harlan Lecturer is The Honorable Stuart Rabner, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey. Sworn into office on June 29, 2007, after being nominated by Governor Jon S. Corzine and confirmed by the Senate, he is the eighth Chief Justice to lead the New Jersey Supreme Court since the 1947 Constitution. Born on June 30, 1960, Chief Justice Rabner was raised in Passaic. He graduated summa cum laude from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University in 1982, and graduated cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1985. He was a law clerk to U.S. District Court Judge Dickinson R. Debevoise before joining the U.S. Attorney's Office in Newark in 1986. After beginning his career as an assistant U.S. attorney, Chief Justice Rabner worked in a number of positions including first assistant U.S. attorney and chief of the terrorism unit. He was chief of the office's criminal division when he was named chief counsel to Governor Corzine in January 2006. He was named New Jersey attorney general in September 2006 and served in that position until his nomination to the Court.

Christopher Eisgruber, who became Princeton's provost in 2004, has written several books on the constitution and the Supreme Court. His books include The Next Justice: Repairing the Supreme Court Appointments Process, Constitutional Self-Government, and Religious Freedom and the Constitution, which he co-wrote with Lawrence G. Sager of the University of Texas at Austin School of Law. Before joining the faculty in 2001, Eisgruber was a clerk for Judge Patrick Higginbotham of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, which has jurisdiction over district courts in Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas, and also for Justice John Paul Stevens of the United States Supreme Court. Eisgruber then served for 11 years on the faculty of New York University School of Law.