Lunch Discussion with Christoph Moellers, Humboldt University Law Faculty

Limits of Differentiation: On the Role of Religion in Democratic Constitutionalism

Date: 
Fri, 10/10/2014
Location: 
By invitation only
Audience: 
Faculty, Fellows, Graduate Students

Faculty, Visitors, Graduate Students only: RSVP to jrivkin@princeton.edu.

Abstract:  "In Western political theory, the relationship between religion and politics has long been described in terms of distinction, if not separation. Keeping both spheres at a distance to one another has been considered– rightly so–as an achievement in the evolution of modern political institutions. The question of how great this distance can or should be has, of course, remained disputed and been answered differently within various democratic states.   Given the growing academic doubt concerning strong conceptions of secularization, which had long been used to explain the linear, growing differentiation of religion, law and politics as part of the progress of modernization, we must think anew about what social differentiation of the religious sphere may mean in constitutional affairs. Establishing a concept that pays more attention to the contexts of religious matters within other social spheres, rather than stipulating the mutual distinctiveness between (or respective autonomy of) religious, legal and political systems from the normative view of constitutional theory, is the goal of this paper."


Cosponsored with the Center of Theological Inquiry