Student Programs

LAPA sponsors a rich variety of law-related programing for students, including Ph.D. candidates and students in the WWS public policy programs. LAPA's Directors advise the joint degree students, while LAPA staff provide resources and assistance in arranging a variety of academic programming as well as student-organized events.

LAW• ENGAGED ‹GRADUATE ‹STUDENTS‹ (LEGS)
Coordinated by LAPA Director Kim Lane Scheppele, the bi-weekly LEGS seminars provide a gathering place for graduate students from across the campus to share their interests and research in law-related topics, as well as to offer practice job talks.

LAW IN THE PUBLIC SERVICE: NOT JUST FOR LAWYERS
This series provides opportunities for candidates for Masters in Public Policy and Public Affairs to engage in off-the-record discussions with policy practitioners to examine legal issues and the role of law in developing and implementing public policy. The dinners allow for wide ranging discussion about the substance of a particular issue as well as questions of ethics, politics and how lawyers and non-lawyers work together to enhance their search for solutions to pressing problems.

UNDERGRADUATE ASSOCIATES
A vibrant group of Princeton undergraduates have established an organization that plans gatherings and engages in law-related projects both exclusively for its members, as well as in collaboration with other programs and academic departments.

THE J. WELLES HENDERSON '43 PRIZE
Created by Federal Judge Arlin M. Adams in honor of his friend, J. Welles Henderson '43, this prize is awarded to the Princeton senior who has written the most outstanding thesis on a law-related subject.  An eligible thesis deals centrally with a question related to law, and may be from any discipline.  Among the topics welcome for consideration are legal history, law and public policy, law and literature, legal philosophy, sociology of law, law and politics, legal anthropology, science and law, psychology of law, law and religion, law and art, as well as law and economics.  The prize committee considers theses in international, comparative or American law, as well as theses primarily about the law of any country other than the U.S.  The prize carries an award of $1,000.