News

Public Speaker

Lawyers and Law: Challenges Facing the Legal Profession and Its Impact on Law

A panel discussion

October 13, 2009, 4:30 PM, Aaron Burr 219

Click here to watch

Please join us for a panel discussion entitled "Lawyers and Law: Challenges Facing the Legal Profession and the Practice of Law," to examine the changing nature of the work and organization of lawyers and law practice and what it means for how people experience and understand law. 

Panel Participants will include John Darley, Dorman T. Warren Professor of Psychology at Princeton; Marc Galanter, the John and Rylla Bosshard Professor of Law and South Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin - Madison and LSE Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science; Robert Gordon, the Chancellor Kent Professor of Law and Legal History at Yale Law School; and Barry Sullivan, Professor of Law and Cooney & Conway Chair in Advocacy at Loyola University School of Law.  Hendrik Hartog, Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor in the History of American Law and Liberty and director of the Program in American Studies at Princeton will moderate the panel.

John M. Darley is the Dorman T. Warren Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton University. His past research examines the ways in which individuals construct their representations of the interpersonal world in which they find themselves. His original work demonstrated that people often failed to intervene in emergency situations because they falsely interpreted the signals they got from the behavior of others as indicating that no real emergency was taking place. Even when they interpreted the event as an emergency, their responsibility for intervening was diffused by their knowledge that others were present who could also respond. The book reporting this research, co -authored with Bibb Latane, received several prizes. In an American Psychologist article, he and Russell Fazio outlined a conceptualization of the psychological version of the self fulfilling prophecy, in which people unknowingly act to bring about confirmations of their erroneous perceptions of their interactants, making those originally false perceptions "true" at least for their interactions with those people, and occasionally true in deeper ways.

Marc Galanter, the John and Rylla Bosshard Professor Emeritus of Law and South Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin - Madison and LSE Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science, studies litigation, lawyers, and legal culture. He is the author of a number of highly regarded and seminal studies of litigation and disputing in the United States (including "Why the 'Haves' Come Out Ahead: Speculations on the Limits of Legal Change," one of the most-cited articles in the legal literature.) His work includes pioneering studies on the impact of disputant capabilities in adjudication, the relation of public legal institutions to informal regulation, and patterns of litigation in the United States, and the organization of the legal profession.. He is co-author of Tournament of Lawyers (with Thomas Palay, 1991) which is widely viewed as the most robust explanation of the growth and transformation of large law firms.   He is an outspoken critic of misrepresentations of the American civil justice system and of the inadequate knowledge base that makes the system so vulnerable to misguided attacks.

Robert Gordon is the Chancellor Kent Professor of Law and Legal History at Yale Law School. His subject areas are contracts, American legal history, evidence, the legal profession, and law and globalization. Prior to coming to Yale, he taught at The University of Wisconsin and Stanford. Professor Gordon has an A.B. and J.D. from Harvard.

Hendrik Hartog is the Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor of the History of American Law and Liberty. He holds a Ph.D. in the History of American Civilization from Brandeis University (1982), a J.D. from the New York University School of Law (1973), and an A.B. from Carleton College (1970). Before coming to Princeton, he taught at the University of Wisconsin Law School (1982-92) and at the Indiana University (Bloomington) School of Law (1977-82). Hartog has spent his scholarly life working in the social history of American law, obsessed with the difficulties and opportunities that come with studying how broad political and cultural themes have been expressed in ordinary legal conflicts. He has worked in a variety of areas of American legal history: on the history of city life, on the history of constitutional rights claims, on the history of marriage, and on the historiography of legal change. He is the author of Public Property and Private Power: the Corporation of the City of New York in American Law, 1730-1870 (1983) and Man and Wife in America: a History (2000). He is the editor of Law in the American Revolution and the Revolution in the Law (1981) and the coeditor of Law in Culture and Culture in Law (2000) and American Public Life and the Historical Imagination (2003). Representative articles include "Pigs and Positivism" (Wisconsin Law Review, 1985); "The Constitution of Aspiration" and "The Rights that Belong to us All" (Journal of American History, 1987); "Mrs. Packard on Dependency" (Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities, 1988); "Abigail Bailey's Coverture: Law in a Married Woman's Consciousness" (in Law in Everyday Life, 1993); "Lawyering, Husbands' Rights, and "The Unwritten Law," in Nineteenth-Century America" (Journal of American History, 1997); and "Llewellyn, Divorce, and Description" (in American Public Life and the Historical Imagination, 2003). He has been awarded a variety of national fellowships and lectureships, and for a decade he coedited Studies in Legal History, the book series of the American Society for Legal History. He is affiliated with Princeton's Program in American Studies

Barry Sullivan, Professor of Law and Cooney & Conway Chair in Advocacy at Loyola University School of Law, graduated from the University of Chicago Law School in 1974 and clerked for Judge John Minor Wisdom of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in 1974-1975. He was an associate (1975-80) and partner (1981-1994, 2001-2009) in Jenner & Block, where he was principally engaged in litigation and served as Co-Chair of the Supreme Court and Appellate Practice Group. Mr. Sullivan has litigated significant cases across the country, at all levels of the state and federal courts, including the Supreme Court of the United States. For example, Mr. Sullivan represented Andrew Wilson in the landmark death penalty case of People v. Wilson, 116 Ill. 2d 29 (1987), which was the first criminal conviction reversed because of police torture in Area 2 of the Chicago Police Department.During 1980 and 1981, Mr. Sullivan served as an Assistant to the Solicitor General of the United States, in which capacity he argued several cases in the Supreme Court of the United States. From 1994 to 1999, Mr. Sullivan was Dean of the Washington and Lee University School of Law. Mr. Sullivan has also been a visiting professor at Northwestern University School of Law, a Fulbright professor at the Faculty of Law and Administration of the University of Warsaw, a visiting law fellow of the University of London (Queen Mary College), and Senior Lecturer in the Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies of the University of Chicago. He was elected to membership in the American Law Institute in 1983.

Left Mini Nav
LAPA Resources for
faculty
students
alumni