LAPA Fellow

 

Tamir Moustafa

Former Fellow, 2005-2006
Jarislowsky Chair in Religion and Cultural Change
School for International Studies
Simon Fraser University, British Columbia

tmoustafa@sfu.ca
Website

Tamir Moustafa teaches and writes in the areas of comparative law and society, religion and politics, and politics of the Middle East.  While at Princeton, he completed his book, The Struggle for Constitutional Power: Law, Politics, and Economic Development in Egypt  (Cambridge, 2007) and initiated work on a co-edited volume, Rule by Law: The Politics of Courts in Authoritarian Regimes (Cambridge, 2008).

Life after LAPA

Since my year at Princeton, I assumed a position as Associate Professor and Jarislowsky Chair in Religion and Cultural Change at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia.  My current work explores the public debates that are generated from dual constitutional commitments to Islamic law and liberal rights provisions in Egypt and Malaysia. In both countries, constitutional provisions enshrining Islamic law and liberal rights lay the seeds for legal friction, and courtrooms have become important sites of contention between groups with competing visions for their states and societies. The project explores how litigation provokes and shapes competing conceptions of national and religious identity, resolves or exacerbates contending visions of Islamic law, and ultimately bolsters or undermines public perceptions of government legitimacy.  A Carnegie Research Scholars grant for the 2009-2011 period helps to fund this research.

Publications

The Struggle for Constitutional Power: Law, Politics, and Economic Development in Egypt (Cambridge University Press, 2007)

Rule by Law: The Politics of Courts in Authoritarian Regimes (with Tom Ginsburg, Cambridge University Press, 2008)

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