Cold War Property Law

Hendrik Hartog, History

Date: 
Fri, 10/04/2019 - 2:00pm
Location: 
LAPA Conference Room, 348 Wallace Hall
Event Category: 
Workshop
Audience: 
By Invitation Only

This is a series of informal workshop sessions for papers in progress. Each is by invitation only and is an RSVP event.

To receive an invitation, please email LAPA Associate Director Leslie Gerwin at lgerwin@princeton.edu.

Hartog
Hendrik Hartog
Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor in the History of American Law and Liberty, Emeritus, and Professor of History, Emeritus.
Princeton University

Hendrik "Dirk" Hartog is the Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor in the History of American Law and Liberty, Emeritus. For a decade, he was the director of Princeton University’s Program in American Studies. Hartog has spent his scholarly life obsessed with the difficulties and opportunities that come with studying how broad political and cultural themes have been expressed in everyday legal conflicts. He has worked in a variety of areas of American legal history: on the history of city life, on the history of constitutional rights claims, on the history of marriage, on the history of slavery and emancipation, and on the historiography of legal change and of legal history. He is the author of Public Property and Private Power: the Corporation of the City of New York in American Law, 1730-1870 (1983), Man and Wife in America: a History (2000), Someday All This Will Be Yours: A History of Inheritance and Old Age (2012), and The Trouble with Minna: A Case of Slavery and Emancipation in the Antebellum North (2018). He has been awarded a variety of national fellowships and lectureships, and for a decade he coedited Studies in Legal History, the book series of the American Society for Legal History. In 2016, he was made an Honorary Fellow of the American Society for Legal History. He is affiliated with Princeton’s Program in Law and Public Affairs, with the Program in American Studies, and with the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies. Before coming to Princeton, he taught at the University of Wisconsin Law School (1982-92) and at the Indiana University (Bloomington) School of Law (1977-82).