Militant Democracy Workshop

Date: 
Fri, 04/16/2010
Location: 
9:15 AM - 6:00 PM, 301 Marx Hall
Event Category: 
Co-sponsored Event
Audience: 
Public

How can liberal democracies defend themselves against their enemies without subverting their core normative principles?  In the past decade this question has been debated mainly with reference to terrorist threats; however, there is an older tradition of reflection on democratic self-defense which emerged from interwar Europe and which primarily deals with those seeking to subvert democracy from within, rather than attack it from without. 

Given the resurgence of populist movements and parties in various parts of the globe, we wish to examine the historical, normative, and practical-political aspects of 'militant democracy', in particular the role of democratic self-defense in the transition to and consolidation of democracies.  In light of the fact that the original conceptions of militant democracy also diagnosed the importance of 'emotionalism' in anti-democratic agitation, we will also carefully look at the psychological dimension of populism and militant democratic self-defense.  

Agenda

9.15 AM

Introduction
Jan-Werner Müller, Princeton

9.45

Banning Political Parties in the Politics of Transition
Peter Niesen, Darmstadt and CES, Harvard
Lead respondent: András Sajó

10.45

Amendment and Legitimacy (tbc)
Andrew Arato, New School
Lead respondent: Patrick Macklem

11.45

Guarding the Perimeter: The Migration of Militant Democracy
Patrick Macklem, University of Toronto
Lead respondent: Andrew Arato

12:45 PM

Break

2:00

Emotionalism in Politics
András Sajó, European Court of Human Rights and CEU, Budapest
Lead Respondent: Kim Lane Scheppele

3:00

Anger and Legitimacy
Ellen Kennedy, University of Pennsylvania
Lead Respondent: Peter Niesen

4:00

Break

4:30

Constitutional Insurrection
Kim Lane Scheppele, Princeton University and Yale Law School
Lead Respondent: Ellen Kennedy

5:30

Concluding Discussion
Chair: Jan-Werner Müller

Presented by the Project in the History of Political Thought, University Center for Human Values, and co-sponsored by the Bobst Center for Peace and Justice
and the Program in Law and Public Affairs.